"In the work of Milica Rakic  the emphasis put on creating a subjective gender self-representation is moved to a broader socio-political context. By using visual and audio archive to evoke collective memory of the ideologically coloured past, the artist questions the genesis of constituting social and gender identities and their interrelations. By bringing together a fictive informal conversation between a man and a woman and images of the political past, she puts an emphasis on a deep and unconscious connection between the usual everyday understanding/playing gender roles and the influence of socio-political and ideological systems of power. The dialogue from the Milica Rakic's video contains a certain conflict present between gender positions within the framework of linguistic discourse."                                                         Curators: Sanja Horvatinčić

 

 

 

Living in silent submission, women were disinclined to writing and assuming the role of active creators of meaning and truth. Helene Cixous and Luce Irigaray point out that writing bears the mark of (male) gender, i.e. that it is governed by a typically male writing economy. By appealing that “woman must write her self: must write about women and bring women to writing,” the two female theorists point out that through the act of writing/speaking a woman can become an active subject that will establish a new (feminine) system of denotation that will give her back her body, her sexuality and her natural power, which were forcefully taken away from her in the previous (masculine) system of denotation. Thus, by re-establishing the link with her own bodily pleasure, woman becomes the initiator of her own rights, and feminine writing (écriture féminine) and feminine speech (parler femme) become “the space that can serve as a springboard for subversive thought, the precursory movement, of a transformation of social and cultural structures.”

The works of Milica Rakić contain provocative messages, more precisely, quotes borrowed from philosophical, poetic and other sources. Joining that which is seemingly not joinable, she informs that which is well known with totally new and unexpected meanings. As few artists have, Milica Rakić, with her plays on words and the intertwining of that which is private, political, everyday and historical, has succeeded in forming a critical picture of today’s society.

Due to the re-traditionalization of society in the wake of the wars in the 1990s and the return to a heavily patriarchal model, today, more than six decades after being granted suffrage, we are again fighting for a society of equal opportunities.

Playing with words, intertwining the private with the political, Milica Rakić translates the past to the present in her particular way, with the obligatory dose of humor, critically thinking about the current image of society. Her works consist of static or moving photographs found on the internet and philosophical, extratemporal, often ironical and always polysemic thoughts which she juxtaposes with history and memory, notably collective memory. Joining that which is seemingly not joinable, Milica Rakić creates links between the photographs and the messages with which she captions them, and they assume a new meaning, because memory is that which requires a narrative in order to be refreshed.

In the works of Milica Rakić, the emphasis put on creating a subjective gender self-representation is removed to a broader socio-political context. By using visual and audio archives to evoke collective memory of the ideologically colored past, the artist questions the genesis of constituting social and gender identities and their interrelations. By bringing together a fictive informal conversation between a man and a woman and images of the political past, she puts an emphasis on a deep and unconscious connection between the usual everyday understanding of/playing gender roles and the influence of socio-political and ideological systems of power. The dialogue in Milica Rakić’s video contains a certain conflict present between gender positions within the framework of linguistic discourse.